Well organised homework can play a vital role in raising standards of achievement.

 

This policy is based on government guidelines which emphasise the importance of homework and how it helps your child to learn, rather than focus on if it takes a certain amount of time.

Why is homework important?

  • It raises your child’s achievement
  • It consolidates and extends the work they have done in school
  • It helps to inform you about your children’s school work and allows and gives you the opportunity to support this work
Daily Weekly
Foundation Reading (at least 20 minutes)
Year 1 Reading (at least 20 minutes) 1 piece of topic homework to be handed in Friday
Year 2 Reading (at least 20 minutes) Spellings (tested Friday)Tables (tested Friday)1 piece of topic homework to be handed in Friday
Year 3 Reading (at least 30 minutes). Some children will be able to do this independently but should be asked questions about their reading Spellings (tested Friday)Tables (tested Friday)1 piece of topic homework to be handed in Friday
Year 4 Reading (at least 30 minutes). Most children will be able to do this independently but should be asked questions about their reading Spellings (tested Friday)Tables (tested Friday)1 piece of topic homework to be handed in Friday
Year 5/6 Reading (at least 30 minutes). Most children will be able to do this independently but should be asked questions about their reading Spellings (tested Friday)Tables (tested Friday)1 piece of topic homework to be handed in Friday

What sort of activities should your child be doing?

Our homework activities are related to the work your child is doing at school but will notalways be written work.

For young children it will usually be:

  • Reading with parents or carers
  • Games or activities to practice literacy, maths or other skills

For older children, homework may also include:

  • Reading
  • Preparing a presentation to the class
  • Finding out information
  • Designing or making something
  • Trying out a simple scientific experiment
  • Solving problems
  • Completing literacy, maths or other work

What homework will your child be doing?

This varies with different year groups –  you will be informed at the beginning of each year.

Feedback on your child’s homework

Children need to know how well they have done and what they could do better. Sometimes work will be discussed in lessons, or teachers may give written comments on just one or two aspects of a piece of work. If your child has difficulties with a piece of homework, they should discuss it with their teacher or you might wish to discuss the problem with us yourself.

Should I help my child with homework?

 Homework allows you to see what your children are doing and to support their learning. This partnership between school and home is a vital part of successful education.

We take the view that children are likely to get more out of an activity if parents get involved.

If you are unsure about how much help to give, you should discuss it with your child’s teacher.

12 things you can do to help your child learn

  1. Give your child confidence through lots of praise and encouragement.
  2. Read to, and with, your child as much as possible (at least 20 minutes a day)
  3. Encourage your child to observe and talk about what they see, feel, think etc.
  4. Make use of the library.
  5. Visit museums and other places you think your child might find interesting.
  6. If your child likes watching television, watch it together sometimes and talk about what has been watched. Children enjoy sharing their experiences and will gain a lot from the discussion.
  7. Try to provide a reasonably quiet and suitable place where your child can work and show that you and all members of the family value and respect the homework activity.
  8. Try to set time aside to support your child’s homework activities whilst also allowing some independence where appropriate.
  9. Encourage your child to discuss homework with you, including feedback from teachers.
  10. Try to help your child to see the enjoyable aspects of homework.
  11. Help your child to see the importance of homework and teach them to become more independent and take more responsibility for themselves as they get older.
  12. Remind your child to complete and hand in homework on time. A copy of your child’s homework programme will be provided at the start of each year.